Window Farms, 4 weeks

Our tomato plant looks so good!

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Do you see the hanging bit?  Yeah that’s the tomato root! It’s grown through the bottle and is now with the bottle below it.  It’s a good plant.

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We always have bean issues.  Some yellow leaves, but the new growth is deep green.  Trying some things with them, not enough nutrients maybe?

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Basil looks healthy.

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Seedlings are starting to say hello to the world, they all came up.

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WindowFarm

If you visit Meowzas from May-October you know we like to garden – alot.  The blog basically turns into a green bushy land of vegetables and happiness.  What happens in the months though we can’t rooftop garden? Well we garden inside!  For Christmas I got Matthew a WindowFarm.  What is a WindowFarm? A Windowfarm is a vertical hydroponic farming system for year-round indoor growing inside.  You still have to nurture it with light (windows or artificial light like we are doing), water and love.   We grew some seedlings and they have started growing, right now it’s just a learning experience (isn’t gardening always?) as we’ve never done hydroponic farming before, so we are testing broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, beans, baby peppers, strawberries and basil.  All the seedlings have come up except for the peppers but they’re on their way.  Once they start growing, we might get a additional light and we’ll eventually have to trellis them up.  Imagine walking inside your apartment and above the cat bowls and next to the front door you have a fresh smelling green garden?  It’s quite beautiful.  Can’t wait to see what it’s like in the next few months.  <3

This is when it was installed the day after Christmas.

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Here is the green bean, broccoli and tomato plant at 1-2 weeks!

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A video when we first installed it:

Real Life

Let’s get personal for a minute. On January 6th my childhood home, where my dad was living, caught on fire.  To say the least, it’s quite a range of emotions that usually result in crying.  My father was the last one to exit the houses (5 houses were on fire) and was saved by a fire fighter.  The house is completely destroyed, it will be torn down, there’s not much left.  My dad got out of the house with pants and a coat on one arm.  I got on the first bus back to Pennsylvania and spent the last few days there.  My dad is my everything so it’s been quite a journey.    You always hear of stories like this and just think it’s sad, then when it happens to you and everything besides memories of your childhood are gone, you realize the destruction of it all.  The memories will always be there though…..much love to my dad. <3

 

The first picture is the back of my brother’s old room where the fire is.  I spent so much time in that room playing Nintendo and dancing to Beastie Boys and Debbie Gibson.

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This is my bedroom and my brother’s bedroom.  There is nothing left in them.

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Broccoli Soup

I made broccoli soup for the first, actually I think it was the first time I ever tasted broccoli soup.  I love soup and I love broccoli so what could go wrong? NOTHING! It’s amazing, try it.  Eat a roll on the side too for more enjoyment.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons margarine
  • 3 large carrots, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 4 cups water
  • 4 tablespoons chicken bouillon powder
  • 1 lb fresh broccoli florets
  • 2 cups low fat milk
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup ice water
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 dash chili pepper

 

Melt margarine in a saucepan over medium heat; add carrots, and garlic, and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally until softened.  You can add onions too but I think that’s gross.

In a medium-sized cooking pot, add 4 cups water and chicken bouillon granules and bring to boil. Add precooked carrot mixture to soup pot. Add broccoli florets, reserving a few pieces to be added near the end of cooking time. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 15 to 20 minutes or until broccoli is just tender.

In a blender or food processor, puree soup in batches and return to pot. Stir in milk and remaining broccoli florets.

In a cup, mix flour with 1/4 cup cold water to form a thin liquid.

Bring soup to boil; add flour mixture slowly, stirring constantly to thicken soup as desired. Add soy sauce, black pepper, chili pepper and stir well.

Garnish with parsley or carrot curls. Serve soup hot or cold.

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Before it goes in the blender.

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Waiting to be pressed.

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Doesn’t look good but is.

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Looks good and is!